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Server Solutions: Hardware Root of Trust - What is it and why is it important?

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By Cindy Walker

In today’s world, securing the IT infrastructure is, and should be, top of mind for organizations.  The impact of a security breach on an organization cannot be overstated. A cyber-attack can cripple an organization and cause irreparable damage.  According to Embroker, Inc., a digitally native business insurance company, “Cybercrime, which includes everything from theft or embezzlement to data hacking and destruction, is up 600% as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.”[1]

The need to protect servers from cyber intrusions and attacks is more important than ever before.  Though protecting server hardware is often overlooked, many servers are now being designed with a secure foundation called a hardware root of trust.

hardware root of trust is based on a hardware-validated boot process that ensures a server can only be started using code from a “trusted” source. A hardware root of trust is implemented using different methods/technologies, depending on the server vendor. Some features of a hardware root of trust include:

  • Protection from firmware attacks
  • Detection of previously undetectable compromised firmware or malware
  • Rapid recovery of the server in the event of an attack
  • Permission to only load trusted firmware on the server
  • Ability to recover from attacks by malicious code to a known and secure state
  • Detection and reporting of unauthorized changes to the operating system or programs
  • Secure CPU software/firmware

For a more secure IT environment, please use servers designed with security in mind, from factory to floor.  BlueAlly provides solutions, expertise, and strategy to allow our partners to focus on innovation within their business. Contact your BlueAlly Account Manager or email us at reach@blueally.com to discover how we can help!


[1] “2021 Must-Know Cyber Attack Statistics and Trends”, Embroker (blog), April 1, 2021, accessed June 24, 2016, https://www.embroker.com/blog/cyber-attack-statistics/.